Tagged: triangle in a square

Sunday sketch #110

I’m always on the lookout for interesting secondary shapes – those shapes that unexpectedly emerge from the whitespace or background of a design. In one of my recent EQ8 sessions (which are becoming longer and more frequent, but unfortunately no less frustrating!), I played around with some lolly/bowtie shapes, and discovered some crosses in the background. With a bit of ingenious spacing and a handy border, I created even more crosses.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #110-1

Those red and white crosses are all the same size, but the colouring gives them different emphasis. They’re both brought to the foreground though, with the original lolly/bowties disappearing into the background (for me, at least).

Did you notice that I didn’t include the thin black lines in this design? They’re included by default in the blocks, but you can remove them in EQ8 before exporting the design as a PDF. Sometimes I like to keep them, but this time I thought the design looked just as good without them.

Sunday sketch #105

Taking those long, pointy strips from Sunday sketch #104, I shortened them and crossed them over one another.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #105-1

Look at those lovely big dodecagons floating around the middle of the design, overlapping with one another.

Adding some shading makes those smaller octagons and hexagons pop out from the background too.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #105-2

These designs could be made into quilt patterns using the ‘triangle in a square’ unit, squares and rectangles.

Sunday sketch #104

Playing around with long X’s – which have the same angle as a 2:1 half-rectangle triangle – produced this sketch, which (again!) lends itself to reverse colour play.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #104-1

I often copy sketches – sometimes over and over again – to add shading or modify them slightly. Shading this one shows how the individual units repeat: either white on black, or black on white.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #104-2

This design could be made using ‘triangle in a square’ units, plus long rectangles. You could also paper-piece those X blocks for accuracy.