Tagged: stripes

Sunday sketch #262

More simple stripes this week. I haven’t finished exploring this idea, but I thought I’d post my progress thus far.

I like those shapes that emerge from between the hash blocks (hopefully that phrase doesn’t flag my blog as dodgy haha) – they’re like ghost circles or squares. Here’s the reverse colourway.

I started this with a different palette, and then expanded it a bit.

 

And even introduced some blocks in a reverse colourway.

 

It feels a bit busy when the blocks contain both dark and light stripes; the design is a bit more coherent when the stripes in the coloured blocks are all dark.

I think there’s more potential with this design; it doesn’t feel quite ‘there’ yet for me. I can’t really describe what I’m looking for, but I’ll know it when I see it!

 

Sunday sketch #260

Often when I create a bunch of quilt designs from one block design, I’ll share them all in a single post. But I split up the latest batch into last week’s Sunday sketch and this week’s. The arrangement is kinda different, and I played with two different colour schemes, so… it felt worthy of a new post.

So, picking up from last week – here’s the same block in a vertical orientation, but with a more limited colour palette. Black and white shapes instead of colour, and a coloured background instead of white. I’ve still used the same arrangement where the stripes are a different colour than the background rectangle in each block. But by alternating the colours and rotating the blocks, the borders between the blocks are less obvious.

This one’s much the same, with the columns shifted one over so that the very left-hand and right-hand edges of the block arrangement are fully straight instead of stepping in and out. I think I prefer the one above.

These blocks have lots of possible arrangements, which can be expanded by adding sashing (similar to last week). Here’s the same design with and without sashing.

The addition (and then subtraction) of sashing really changes the feeling of movement within the design.

So, like last week’s design, this one’s all rectangles (some long and skinny, some larger). There are a lot of repeated elements, which means lots of chain-piecing possibilities! I think you could sew lots of long strips together and then subcut them into the pieces needed for each block. There’s also be  places where you’d need to match points fairly carefully (not everyone’s cup of tea).

 

Sunday sketch #235

This is my last Sunday sketch for 2020… and the fact that I opted for muted colours is maybe a reflection of the type of year it’s been…!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #235-1

I started by sketching some overlapping stripes, then moved from my dot pad to EQ8 to take it further. Whenever you get overlapping shapes, there’s an opportunity to introduce transparency by playing with colour. But sometimes I think I take it too far… it can get a bit overworked and come off as forced. So I’m constantly trying to balance design aesthetics with the ‘too far’ factor. Not sure which side of that fence I landed on today, but I wasn’t in the mood to explore further, so here we are.

I did try some different colours, some of which are in my usual palette. Here, I opted to avoid the transparency effect by using black to mark the overlap between the red and khaki rectangles.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #235-2

And here’s the black doing the same job for a red and pink version.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #235-3

Translating these designs into a quilt pattern would be easy-peasy… it’s all just stripes (long rectangles). The hardest part would be making sure all the edges lined up properly. I’d probably tackle that by piecing the design in 5 columns, then adding the large border pieces.

Update (30 December 2020): A friend pointed out that this design is similar to the Fruity Stripe fabrics from Melody Miller’s Clementine range for Ruby Star Society (manufactured by Moda Fabrics). There are definite similarities! The fabric’s stripes are angled, whereas mine are arranged horizontally. And both the width and the length of the overlap varies in the fabric, whereas they are consistent in my design. But both designs use the overlap as an opportunity to play with transparency. Not surprisingly, Melody’s colour choices are infinitely better than mine 🙂