Tagged: sashing

Sunday sketch #326

So, here’s a funny story… I designed this week’s Sunday sketch a few years ago, and loved it so much (SO MUCH!) that I held back on posting it so I could make it into a quilt first. Often I’ll get excited about a design and fall down a rabbit hole of fabric selecting and online ordering… and then I lose interest (it’s the paradox of choice). But with this one, I actually made it!

Here’s the sketch (check out the acid yellow!)…

And here’s the actual quilt!

 

It’s a little hard to tell in that pic, but I bound the quilt in the acid yellow. Thanks to Valerie of Sweet Gum Quilting for the horizontal 1/2″ straight-line quilting, which I love.

So anyway, after I bound the quilt, I packed it away so I could take a proper photo eventually… and then forgot all about it. Oops. Which is kinda crazy, cos I still LOVE this design. It’s so simple, yet it works so well with a huge range of palettes.

With a dark background…

…and a light one.

This is a 5 x 5 block layout with a 5-colour palette, and each block contains three elements (the middle square, the star arms, and the background squircle). That combination means that each colour can be used once per row and per column in each of the three elements. Although if you look closely enough, you’ll see that I had to break that rule in a few places.

Including white in the 5-colour palette means that a few stars don’t have a background squircle. I like how that opens up the design a bit and adds some negative space for the eye to rest. (The sashing between the blocks helps with that too.)

You can see that despite all the possible block permutations (3 elements x 5 colours), there are still a few blocks that are repeated in the previous versions. I tried again with the colour placement to avoid repetition, but it’s not easy! These next two versions feel a smidge ‘heavier’ to me, but maybe the larger number of unique blocks just makes the design seem busier?

Of course, you could avoid the difficulty of colour placement by using fewer colours and going with just two blocks in an alternating layout.

I also like alternating the ‘full’ star blocks with the ‘bare’ star blocks, which lightens the design a bit more.

I know I’ve only used solid colours in these variations, but I think this design is one that would work really well with prints, particularly a coordinating range of fabrics.

This week’s sketch could be made into a quilt using quarter-circle (or drunkard’s path) units, triangle-in-a-square units (or half-rectangle triangles), squares, and sashing. I know a lot of people don’t like using sashing, but I like how it opens up a quilt design and lets the blocks breathe a little. OK, that sounds weird, but basically quilts feel less crowded to me when they have sashing.

Anyway, I’m not sure I’ve ever re-made the same quilt design before, but I’m very tempted to make another one of these quilts. It was awhile ago that I made it, but I’m pretty sure it came together quickly, as there are only a few basic shapes you need to make. As usual for me, the longest part was deciding on the colour palette.

 

 

Sunday sketch #231

You might be able to see the similarities between this week’s Sunday sketch and last week’s. Instead of a central diamond (or square on point) for the pill shape, I’ve just used a circle. Depending on how you look at it (or what colours you use), the circle can look like the shape created by two overlapping pill shapes.

Here I’ve just picked five colours and applied them in a regular pattern.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-1

Paring back the design a little focuses only on those long pill shapes.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-2

In the next two versions, I’ve used the same colour consistently for the shapes running horizontally (pink or yellow) or diagonally (green or pale pink). The centre spots are all the same colour.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-3Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-4

But I could also go in the opposite direction and use a random mix of colours and positions. This one’s my favourite!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-5

Of course, the design can also be rotated by 90 degrees so that the shapes run horizontally. Here I’ve limited the centre circles to just two colours, and run them vertically.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-6

Or you could flip the design back so that the shapes are vertical again, but with the colours running diagonal. Don’t these look like lipsticks all lined up? OK, maybe not the yellow ones… 😉

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #231-7

These designs could all be made with drunkard’s path or semi-circle blocks, plus some rectangles and sashing. There’s lots of repetition in these designs, which lends itself well to chain-piecing!

 

 

Sunday sketch #204

I continued on last week’s theme of blocks made up of thin lines. I stuck with the curvy block and added a few more, then jumbled them up. I wanted to design the blocks so that there’d be instances of (some of) the lines continuing from one block to the next. And I separated the blocks using sashing of the same thickness.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-1

I played around with colours for ages, but didn’t find anything that I liked as much as the black and white.

The whole design feels quite whimsical to me, hence the candy colours, I think.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-2Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-3

Or each block could be coloured differently. This gives the whole design quite a different feel (maybe also because my choice of colour palette’s not so hot).

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-4

Or monochrome. I picked a vibrant yellow, and then reversed it, but of course this would work for any combination of two colours.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-5Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #204-6

This design reminds me a bit of breeze blocks, those concrete blocks that let air through. (Speaking of which, check out how quilter Ben Millett created 4″ breeze-block-like units earlier this year, here and here. I’m hoping he makes them into a quilt!)

My design could be made into a quilt pattern – with blocks in whatever arrangement you wanted – using a combination of normal piecing (for straight bits) and paper piecing (for curves) for accuracy. Lots of variation and versatility!