Sunday sketch #64

I went through a bit of a diamond phase a few months back, and every so often I dip back into diamonds to keep exploring this new shape (well, new to me).

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #64

I’ll probably refine this sketch further, as it actually has a mistake in the bottom right (chevrons pointing right instead of left). Although it may look like a random design, there is (or is supposed to be) an underlying structure! You know I can’t do spontaneity without a plan 🙂

 

 

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Sunday sketch #63

I’ve done very little sketching lately. And when I say ‘very little’, I mean ‘absolutely none’. A combination of work, travel…and work travel hasn’t left me much time for quilt-related stuff. But luckily I’ve got extra sketches from awhile back that I can pull out when I need to!

I tried a few different herringbone-like designs a few weeks ago, and here are another two:

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #63-1

Is it still a herringbone design if the stripes point only in one direction?

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #63-2

These designs could be made by cutting stripes at an angle, or by piecing together each stripe from multiple half-rectangle triangles.

 

 

Sunday sketch #62

Part of what kept me interested in last week’s sketch is the odd perspective — on the left, the top of the zig-zags is in full view; on the right, it’s the bottom. That sort of unnatural, confusing perspective makes me look at the design again and again.

I haven’t played with perspective much yet, so this might be an area I delve into a little more. This week’s sketch is based on a quick doodle that I made of an apartment building façade in Melbourne awhile back; I found it on the back of a receipt when cleaning out my wallet recently.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #61-1

I like how rotating the sketch gives an entirely new look — a new perspective — to the design:

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #61-2

Or even…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #61-3

If you were brave enough to try a Y-seam, this design could be made into a quilt pattern by combining a triangle and two right trapezoids. Otherwise, you could just use two rectangles, one half-square triangle and one 2:1 half-rectangle triangle per block.