Sunday sketch #164

The drunkard’s path shape (single or double) is now something I’m comfortable sewing – so I feel like my brain is more open to the possibility of creating designs with it. Unfortunately I still can’t draw a decent curve, so I use EQ8 to design curve-based quilts. I can’t always translate what’s in my brain to the screen, but playing around with the software can still produce some fun(ny) ideas.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #151

The colour and the optical illusion just feel really 80s to me, although I can’t put my finger on exactly why… it reminds me of something, but I’m not sure what.

You can probably see from the hints of red along the bottom and right-hand side of this image that the design started out a bit bigger, but I cropped it. I’ll often create something in EQ8 and then decide that I like a smaller version. It might mean that a block is cut off (and that the actual construction of the quilt might take a little more effort), but I usually think about design first, construction second.

This design could be made into a quilt using a ton of drunkard’s path blocks and squares of background colour. Not technically difficult, but very repetitive!

Sunday sketch #163

There should be a name for when the same shape appears in the foreground and the background in a repeating pattern. It hasn’t happened for awhile – the last one I can spot on my Instagram feed was Sunday sketch #110, posted in August 2018. Sunday sketches #102,  #103 and #104 are also good examples (I was obviously hung up on that theme then!).

In this week’s design, the pointy crosses – the ones in that light and dark teal – come to the foreground. The coral shapes recede to the background.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #163-1

But look closer: those coral units are the exact same size and shape – a pointy cross. Each of the background shapes is made from the corners of the adjacent 4 blocks, but they end up being the same as the main shape that appears in the centre of the block.

Together, they make a checkerboard grid on point. The white squares help to break up the repetition, and the slightly different colouring of the two sets of shapes helps to distinguish them further.

Alternating the block colouring helps to define the boundaries between blocks, and disguises the similarity between the foreground and background shapes even more.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #163-2

Again, those white squares help to break up the colour and the busy-ness of this design.

As a block-based quilt, this one would be relatively easy to make. It’s just half-square triangles, flying geese units, a square-in-a-square unit, and some squares and rectangles. It’d be great for playing with transparency.

 

Sunday sketch #162

I haven’t had much time to sketch lately, so I’ve been looking back at older designs that I never posted. Maybe I had other sketches that I liked more at the time, or I moved off in different directions and some designs didn’t seem so relevant anymore. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t like them, and didn’t plan to share them one day!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #162

This one would be really easy to make into a quilt: it’s all just squares and rectangles. The blocks could be pieced using a courthouse-steps approach, with the dark square corners pieced into a longer strip beforehand. An easy block-based quilt with a bit of sashing.