Sunday sketch #124

I have a pretty big backlog of EQ8 designs to share, which is probably one of the reasons why I’ve felt less urgency to hand-sketch lately. I did pick up my dot pad recently though, which always feels great and makes me wonder why I don’t do it more often.

This week’s sketch arose from another series that I haven’t shared here. Sometimes a design is nothing special, but it leads to something else that’s more interesting. This design is an example of that… I started with some long skinny rectangles set at an angle, but they were kinda boring. But then I cut each one in half diagonally, and created this spiky block.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #124-1

Repeated in a 4 x 4 layout, the last spike in each block meets up with the first spike in the next block, which lends some continuity to the whole design. Emphasising different sides of each block – through the use of dark and light colours – also helps to make new shapes.

There are a million and one ways to colour this design – and to create new shapes through colour. Of course, I usually settle on the obvious: a gradation from dark to light. Reds seemed like a good choice for such a dynamic design.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #124-2

This design would be easiest to translate into a quilt pattern using foundation paper piecing. I’m not normally a fan of FPP, but in this case I think it would be super-easy way to get the crisp lines and angles needed to make this design pop.

Sunday sketch #123

Sunday sketch #122 followed a single line from one edge of the design to the other. I’ve created quite a few new designs using the same concept. The only difference is that instead of making the line a black stripe, I’m using it like a border separating two colours. Just like the original inspiration by Jo Delahaus, this week’s design combines straight lines and curves.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #123

I love two-colour designs, but I can never decide on the best two colours!

This design could be translated into a quilt pattern quite easily using rectangles, squares and a few drunkard’s path blocks.

Sunday sketch #122

I’ve mentioned before that I find inspiration in a lot of different places. An obvious one is Instagram. I don’t just follow quilters; I follow painters and potters, sketchers and screenprinters, woodworkers and weavers. I also follow fellow art lovers who post images of artworks that inspire them. It’s a great way to see stuff that I wouldn’t otherwise find.

Recently I discovered @dust_jackets, and scrolled back through his/her/their feed to find a stunning image of a thick black line tracing bold shapes against an off-white background:

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It was hashtagged #jodelahaut and #1953. So who’s Jo Delahaut?

Turns out he’s one of Belgium’s first abstract artists, and a key figure in the geometric abstraction movement. His profile on Artnet includes at least two untitled pieces using a similar concept and shapes: the one from 1953, and another one from 1954. Beautiful.

So anyway, back to the art: I couldn’t get one of the motifs – the one that looks half-rectangle, half-circle – out of my head, so I decided to play around with it a bit. I wanted to explore that shape, but also the idea of a single line tracing through a bunch of different shapes (a little like my Sound Maze pattern).

I started by recreating the half-rectangle, half-circle shape, in a more condensed form. I alternated the direction of the shapes to add a little more interest and movement.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #122-1

These shapes look a bit like letters to me… ‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’ and ‘e’ seem to pop out. Can you see them?

Then I changed the motif to circular on both sides, just to see what it looked like.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #122-2

I can’t decide if I like it more or not! I do like those large (broken) rectangles that appear to float above the shapes though (in both designs).

Finally, I decided to try the other alternative: the version with all hard angles and no curves.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #122-3

It’s funny how similar and yet how different the three designs are. And I still can’t tell which one I like the most!

I’m not sure how I’d translate these designs into actual quilt patterns. I like the idea of piecing the dark lines against a light background, but it would also be possible to appliqué strips if you were careful to keep everything lined up very straight.