Sunday sketch #172

It’s been a couple of months since I posted a hand-drawn sketch. I’ve been sketching less lately. Often I start with a dot pad and quickly move to EQ8 when I’ve decided on a motif that I want to explore further. Other times, it’s just easier to start with EQ8. Hand-sketching can require a level of concentration and thought that I don’t always have. But of course, concentration and thought take practice, and they’re easy to lose if you don’t nurture them with time and attention. A gentle reminder to myself that I should make time to sketch, even when there seem to be easier alternatives.

Anyway…! Here’s what I was working on when I last opened my dot pad.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #172-1

I’ve explored this idea of ‘folded ribbons’ before – see Sunday sketches #74, #75 and #76, for example – and it’s the sort of thing that could spark a thousand more designs. But this time, I wanted to play with the idea of the ‘folded’ bit being a feature, creating its own path.

I ended up designing quite a few variations, with different canvas shapes (square-ish above; rectangular-ish, below), or numbers of lines in each group, or proximity of lines.

Geometriquilt_SS172-2.JPG

Imagine using a really bold print for those lines in the foreground. Wouldn’t that pack a punch?

I’m still working through this idea in my head and on paper, so I may have more of these to show you sometime soon (assuming another design idea doesn’t grab my attention in the meantime!).

This design could be translated into a quilt pattern using long strips (and some careful cutting to maintain the proper angles) or even a lot of triangles.

Sunday sketch #171

This week’s design started on my sketchpad. I often doodle half-square triangles or parallelograms, and I began with a shape I’ve used before – overlapping parallelograms that create little cat ears poking out the top (I used something similar in Sunday sketches #114 and #160). I’d never really done much with just that shape though, so I decided to keep working on it. I knew if I wanted to play with colour or transparency, I’d have to recreate the shape in EQ8. So I did.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #171-1

This design actually started out a little differently… I began with a looser arrangement. The same elements were all there, but the blocks were wider and longer, leaving more negative space.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #171-2

As always, I’m never completely sure which version I like best. I think in this case, the tighter version with less negative space wins out. I’m not sure why. Maybe because it brings those white squares (on point) a bit closer together and makes them more obvious, which adds another interesting element to the design.

Each design could be translated into a quilt pattern using squares, rectangles, half-square triangles and quarter-square triangles.

 

 

Sunday sketch #170

Arrows, this way and that.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #170-1

This design started out a little… busier, but I pared it down a bit. Here are the precursor designs…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #170-2          Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #170-3

I think the top-right design is a bit too crowded. Maybe a better colour palette would help to differentiate between the 4 directions?

Anyway, I think I prefer a design with some of the blocks left empty. Here’s one with just two colours, crossing diagonally.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #170-4

See that centre square, on point, where the blocks of different colour overlap? That’s another opportunity for some colour play. You can see it more clearly if I use a different palette.

Geometriquilt_SS170-4b

Of course, I usually go for a regular, symmetrical design first, then follow it up with a more irregular, asymmetrical design.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #170-5

 

Lots of opportunity for playing around with colour and placement!

These designs would be pretty easy to translate into a quilt pattern. The arrow heads are just triangles, and the tails are smaller triangles separated by a rectangle. The tails might be easier to make using paper-piecing to get the necessary precision.