Tagged: kite

Sunday sketch #135

I have a whole Pinterest board devoted to quilts with stars. Simple or complicated, solid or scrappy… there are so many ways to make stars (and to make them look good!).

This week’s Sunday sketch is yet another iteration of the past few weeks’ designs, with yet more tweaks. In this case, the link between the previous designs is starting to get a little tenuous… I retained one of the original blocks, but changed the other one to a star. Because who doesn’t love a good star?!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #135

I also went back to the colours of #133: teals (or are they sea blues?) and that warm yellow. With a bit of transparency thrown in for good measure.

This design could be made into a quilt pattern using flying geese, rectangles, squares, triangle in a square blocks, and a modified kite block. The star blocks could probably be paper-pieced although I haven’t actually thought how, exactly. They are like slightly wonky sawtooth stars, so maybe that would be a way to approach them.

 

Sunday sketch #12

Last week I wrote about using single units in an ordered or random arrangement. It’s amazing how many designs you can get out of one shape. Last week it was a triangle; this week it’s a kite. I always seem to start with the random arrangement first.

geometriquilt_ss12-1

Within each 2-by-2 square on my Rhodia pad, the sharp end of the kite can point in any one of 4 directions: north-east, north-west, south-east or south-west. That creates a lot of potential combinations for this simple repeating shape. Some pretty interesting secondary patterns can emerge as well – can you see those wide-headed, narrow-tailed arrows in the middle design below?

geometriquilt_ss12-2

The third design, above, reminds me of the sawtooth leaves of some Banksia species.

Even more possibilities…

geometriquilt_ss12-3

I’m tempted to design some kind of sampler quilt with rows or blocks of these different repetitive patterns. The kite unit could be made in a number of ways; I’d probably opt for paper piecing for precision.