Tagged: quarter-square triangles

Sunday sketch #308

I was so excited when I created this week’s sketch, I set it aside thinking I might actually make it into a quilt… I even bought fabric! But I’ve since been distracted by many other designs and ideas… and even used some of the fabric for something else. That happens more often than I’d like to admit…!

You can probably see how this sketch evolved from last week’s. I wasn’t going to post that one last week – I much prefer this design, and I didn’t think it was really necessary to show the precursor – but I ended up sharing it so I could talk about how easily different people can come up with similar designs.

But back to this week’s design. This version chops the ends off those chevron-y bits, and instead turns them inward, creating what look like squares that are on point and overlapping. The flying geese units topping each square are still there, and there’s still the opportunity to play with foreground and background colours (and negative space). Instead of there being a vertical straight line between blocks, there are now columns of smaller squares.

A more restricted palette helps to play on the repetition in the design and introduce some more movement, I think. Those internal background squares help to join diagonally adjacent shapes of the same colour, so your eye zig-zags back and forth across the design.

Those smaller flying geese can go uncoloured (or take the background colour), which changes the main shape into something with a cut-out rather than an extension.

It’s pretty much just another excuse for my usual palette of rose pink and bright orange.

There are a few different ways that this design could be made into a quilt. I’d probably make columns of flying geese and alternate them with columns of quarter-square triangle units or square-in-a-square units. My default is always to imagine designs in solid fabrics, but I think this could work with the right prints.

 

Sunday sketch #274

This week’s design isn’t overly original, but I enjoyed playing with this concept and felt like sharing it.

I’ve played with these split quarter-square triangles and split quarter-rectangle triangles before – see Sunday sketches #166 and #188, for example (two of my favourite sketches!). I really love these shapes and how they create movement in a design.

I also love how your eye is drawn to different sets of lines, depending on colour palette and placement. In the top design, I look at those diagonal lines first, but in the bottom one, my eye’s drawn to the vertical lines instead.

Split quarter-square triangles are easy to make – just cross a half-square triangle with a solid square. Ditto for the split quarter-rectangle triangles, although I must admit I’ve never actually made one. I’d probably paper-piece them instead, just to be more precise (and save all the fabric wastage I often seem to get when I make HRTs two at a time).

 

Sunday sketch #215

I love this week’s design – super-simple, but super-cute too. Sometimes the most basic designs have the biggest visual impact!

Geometriquilt_SS215-1

A limited palette (just yellow and white) makes it easier to see those curves winding their way across the design, connecting each block. They’re also visible in the reverse colourway. Honestly, I could make all the quilts in this yellow. I love it!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-2

Two main elements pop out when you look at the design: the pinwheels and the background checkerboard. That still offers up lots of opportunity for different colour placement, even with a limited palette. Here I’ve only used two colours (yellow and pink) plus white.

Keeping the checkerboard consistent and changing some of the pinwheels…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-3

Or keeping the pinwheels consistent and changing some of the checkerboard…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-4

Or changing both the checkerboard and the pinwheels (and introducing one more colour)…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-5

Saturating the design more, but keeping a few pinwheels white…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-6

Or even fewer white…

Geometriquilt_SS215-7

Or none at all…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-8

Replacing the yellow in the previous version gives you a monochrome version again, but slightly different than the first one. The outermost blocks are pinwheels rather than checkerboards, so the whole design now has a square edge. This emphasises the internal horizontal and vertical lines, too.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-9

And, finally, a little bit of whimsy to end on. I was going to show what a section of the previous version looks like against a coloured background, but decided to keep these extra curves in. I like how they’re a little reminder of the internal curves.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-10

Another reason why those little curves stayed in is because of how I designed the block in this Sunday sketch… and cos I was too lazy to change it when I realised there was an easier construction method.

Originally, each block was made from two drunkard’s path units and two half-square triangles (with each pair in opposite corners). When drawing in EQ8, I didn’t bother separating the drunkard’s path unit from the HST, to make it easier/quicker to colour in. But that meant that some HSTs are still attached to curves, so I couldn’t get that straight edge I was after. But I’m actually glad – those curves are a lovely little design feature!

Anyway, in hindsight, it would probably be easier to alternate two block types: one made from four drunkard’s path units (the pinwheel), and the other made from a quarter-square triangle (to create the checkerboard). If you chain-pieced a bunch of curves, I reckon a quilt made from this design would come together in no time.