Sunday sketch #215

I love this week’s design – super-simple, but super-cute too. Sometimes the most basic designs have the biggest visual impact!

Geometriquilt_SS215-1

A limited palette (just yellow and white) makes it easier to see those curves winding their way across the design, connecting each block. They’re also visible in the reverse colourway. Honestly, I could make all the quilts in this yellow. I love it!

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-2

Two main elements pop out when you look at the design: the pinwheels and the background checkerboard. That still offers up lots of opportunity for different colour placement, even with a limited palette. Here I’ve only used two colours (yellow and pink) plus white.

Keeping the checkerboard consistent and changing some of the pinwheels…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-3

Or keeping the pinwheels consistent and changing some of the checkerboard…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-4

Or changing both the checkerboard and the pinwheels (and introducing one more colour)…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-5

Saturating the design more, but keeping a few pinwheels white…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-6

Or even fewer white…

Geometriquilt_SS215-7

Or none at all…

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-8

Replacing the yellow in the previous version gives you a monochrome version again, but slightly different than the first one. The outermost blocks are pinwheels rather than checkerboards, so the whole design now has a square edge. This emphasises the internal horizontal and vertical lines, too.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-9

And, finally, a little bit of whimsy to end on. I was going to show what a section of the previous version looks like against a coloured background, but decided to keep these extra curves in. I like how they’re a little reminder of the internal curves.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #215-10

Another reason why those little curves stayed in is because of how I designed the block in this Sunday sketch… and cos I was too lazy to change it when I realised there was an easier construction method.

Originally, each block was made from two drunkard’s path units and two half-square triangles (with each pair in opposite corners). When drawing in EQ8, I didn’t bother separating the drunkard’s path unit from the HST, to make it easier/quicker to colour in. But that meant that some HSTs are still attached to curves, so I couldn’t get that straight edge I was after. But I’m actually glad – those curves are a lovely little design feature!

Anyway, in hindsight, it would probably be easier to alternate two block types: one made from four drunkard’s path units (the pinwheel), and the other made from a quarter-square triangle (to create the checkerboard). If you chain-pieced a bunch of curves, I reckon a quilt made from this design would come together in no time.

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