Sunday sketch #156

I haven’t designed a whole lot with chevrons, although I really love the shape. In fact, I think it’s been about two years (!) since I posted a chevron design! Sunday sketch #52, posted back in June 2017, was an idea I had for using up a stack of 5″ Carolyn Friedlander charms (the result of which is still in my WIP pile, mostly because I need more background fabric and I can’t remember the exact shade/manufacturer of white that I used for the blocks I’ve already made… oops!).

Sunday sketch #80, which became the Festive Flocks quilt pattern, also had a few chevrons, but they weren’t the main focus of the design.

Anyway, I recently picked up my A4-sized Rhodia dot pad and just started sketching chevrons randomly overlapping on the page.

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #156

Whenever I create an asymmetrical design like this, I still try to keep it balanced. So you’ll often see that a design that starts at the bottom left with end at the top right, or vice versa. And, if you drew a line across the middle (horizontally or vertically), you’d probably find roughly the same number of lines or shapes on each side. It’s how my order-loving brain copes with disorder 🙂

The movement in this design totally reminds me of a flutter of butterflies just randomly flying around, flapping their wings and getting in each other’s way.

I love all the little (and some big) shapes that appear when the chevrons overlap: squares, rectangles, triangles, diamonds…. And I love how, when it gets really busy, it’s hard to see where the chevrons end and those shapes begin. It’s all just lines and angles.

This design would be fairly easy to piece, although possibly tricky (or at least time-consuming) to plan out. I figure any design that’s created on a grid can be made in fabric with a few calculations. This one would be quite a few calculations… but it’s doable with a bunch of half-square triangles and quarter-square triangles. It would just take a lot of planning. Especially if you wanted to play around with colour and create the effect of transparency.

 

 

 

Sunday sketch #155

Recently I created a bunch of related designs that I figured I’d just post together, since they’re so similar. They’re all based on triangles – mostly half-square triangles, but also some flying geese and some elongated diamond shapes (rhombi!).

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #155-1Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #155-2

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #155-3Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #155-4

I wanted to recreate the feel of my Heartbreaker quilt pattern – those long diagonal lines created by adjacent half-square triangles – and ended up sketching one design after another on my Rhodia dot pad. There really are no limits to how you can use those shapes in that way.

I love the energy and movement in these designs, and the way they evoke electricity pylons, or maybe cranes, or building scaffolding.

I plan to keep sketching more along this theme. I’d love to try making one of these designs into an actual quilt. I’d prefer to use piecing, although I think you could also make these designs using appliquéd bias strips (if you had a very steady hand or a long straight edge!).

 

Sunday sketch #154

I’m a sucker for a good star quilt. I’ve even collected a bunch of my favourites in a Pinterest board.

So I made my own star-in-a-star design. Twice the twinkle! 😉

 

Geometriquilt: Sunday sketch #154

I separated the centre 4 half-square triangles and the triangle-in-a-square blocks to create a kind of halo in the middle of the block. The half-square triangles in the corners end up framing the halo nicely. I couldn’t decide if I liked the more saturated colours in the middle or on the outside, so I just alternated them instead.

The design can look just as cute in two colours…

It's so simple that I wouldn't be surprised to see other similar designs out there.

This design is so simple that I wouldn’t be surprised if there were other similar ones out there. To make this design into a quilt, you’d just need just some half-square triangles, squares, rectangles, and triangle-in-a-square blocks. Super simple!